Safe Fun in the Summer Sun

June 29, 2016

Posted by Lisa Lomasney

National UV Safety Month

Protecting your family's skin is very important during the warm and sunny months of summer.  Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States.  Ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun are the main cause of skin cancer.  This is just one of the reasons why AppleTree & Gilden Woods is proud to participate in UV Safety Month and help raise awareness of the risks of sun damage.  During the month of July, join us in taking action to prevent skin cancer and reduce the risk of UV damage.

All skin types require UV protection.  You can take steps today to protect your skin.

  1. UV reflection from sand, water, pavement, cement, and snow doubles the amount of ultraviolet exposure.
  2. Check your local paper or radio station daily for the UV index.  The higher the number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.
  3. Protect children by limiting their sun exposure and applying sunscreen to children 6 months and older.
  4. Stay out of the sun between 10:00 am and 3:00 pm, when the sun's rays are the strongest.
  5. Wear a sunscreen with a minimum of 15 SPF, even on cloudy days.
  6. Wear sunscreen under clothing; a standard t-shirt only provides SPF protection of 5 - 8.
  7. Apply sunscreen at least 15 minutes before going outdoors and reapply every two hours, especially during exercise or swimming.
  8. Be sure sunglasses have UVA and UVB protections, which should filter at least 80% of the sun's rays.
  9. Sunscreen is only a part of the program, which includes a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, a long-sleeved shirt, and pants.
  10. Don't forget to apply sunscreen to lips and ears!

Going out in the sun is fun but we have to be careful about the risks involved.  You can help protect your family from the dangers of skin cancer by taking a few preventative steps.  By ensuring that each person in your family puts on sunscreen before heading out the door you are taking the first step to reduce the chance of getting this disease.

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