Books to Help Teach Children Friendliness

October 1, 2018

Posted by Hallie Hagland

There are so many benefits of reading to your children, encouraging them to read on their own when they have acquired that skill set, and letting them read to you even if they are repeating back what you have read to them. The earlier your child is exposed to reading, the better relationship they will have with reading in the future which leads to a stronger, more complex vocabulary, enhanced concentration, exposure to a wealth of knowledge, and many other benefits.

Books expose children to a wide variety different situations, characteristics, worlds, cultures, and vocabulary. Books are such an amazing tool when it comes to teaching our children. There are books for almost every life situation, struggle, or hardship. During the month of September at AppleTree & Gilden Woods, we focus on teaching children friendliness. Being kind and friendly is a positive characteristic that we can start to cultivate in our children. We recommend the following titles since they speak directly to friendliness, but as always with children’s materials, parents should preview for family alignment and age appropriateness.

“Want to Play? Kids Talk About Friendliness” by: Pamela Hill Nettelson

Recommended Age: 5-11 years

Uses an advice-column format to define friendship as a character value and demonstrates how it can be used in daily situations.

 

 “How to be a Friend” by: Laurie Krasny Brown

Recommended Age: 5-8 years

With playful full-color illustrations, Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown help kids cope with everyday social situations and learn: Who can be your friend, how to show someone you would like to be friends, how to handle bosses and bullies.

“I walk with Vanessa” by: Kerascoet

Recommeded Age: 3-8 years

This simple yet powerful picture book tells the story of one girl who inspires a community to stand up to bullying. Inspired by real events, I Walk with Vanessa explores the feelings of helplessness and anger that arise in the wake of seeing a classmate treated badly and shows how a single act of kindness can lead to an entire community joining in to help. With themes of acceptance, kindness, and strength in numbers, this timeless and profound feel-good story will resonate with readers young and old.

 

“The Jelly Donut Difference, Sharing Kindness with the World” by: Maria Dismondy

Recommended Age: 3-10 years

Leah and Dexter are brother and sister. They don’t always get along. In fact, there are times they can be downright mean to each other. The ooey, gooey jelly donuts in this story are a testament to the power of kindness, caring and generosity. Find out if Leah and Dexter will ever learn to get along! Bite into the power of paying it forward by adding The Jelly Donut Difference to your family’s home collection or classroom library.

cover image source
<< Back